Author: streetcrymediaproductions

MYTR Sampler

Hello all, here’s a sample of some of the projects Mark’s been working on under the MYTR banner. It’s just a small sampling but it does give some perspective of what’s going on behind the scenes. Enjoy, and they’ll be more coming in the near future we’re sure.

Regards,

J.D. -StreetCry Media Partners

 

 

 

© 2017 Mark St.Cyr In Assoc. with StreetCry Media Partners, All Rights Reserved

Adding To The Growing List

Hello all. I just wanted to share that Mark has been asked by the financial website Seeking Alpha if their editorial team could monitor and repost relevant articles for their readers onto their platform. Of course Mark said yes and welcomes the additional readership.

For those wanting a little insight into who Seeking Alpha is, here are a few references from their Wiki page.

“In 2013, WIRED magazine named Seeking Alpha one of its, “…core nutrients of a good data diet.” WIRED: 101 Signals. In 2007, Seeking Alpha was the recipient of Forbes’ Best of the Web Award[14] and was selected by Kiplinger’s as its pick for Best Investment Informant.[15] In 2011 Seeking Alpha was listed as #1 in Inc. magazine’s list of Essential Economic blogs.”

As per SimilarWeb their audience engagement states to be around 20 million views monthly.

Screengrab at SimilarWeb

Screengrab at SimilarWeb

As always, thanks to everyone!

V.V. –StreetCry Media

 

The Problem With Kids Today: They’re 26!

(Note: Usually Mark doesn’t “repost” older articles but we were asked for permission on this one in response to a current discussion about millennials and their current work ethics. And after reading it once again we thought it was worth another post. It was originally written in 2012 although it seems to carry just as much relevance today.    -V.V.  StreetCry Media)

 

Every generation as they grow older looks at the ones coming up with a jaundiced eye. They look and say “In my day we walked to school – barefoot – in snow – uphill – both ways!” However there seems to be something quite different today. Everybody’s still in school.

Although many will pile on that kids are different today because of this or that, I’ll contend there is one over arching reason for the problems that plague most of them: Most never had the ability to learn or start adulthood early as many like myself did.

We started becoming self-sufficient at about age 13. For those trying to put the age to a year. I was born in the early 1960’s. So that’s my time frame for this discussion.

When I was a kid we had very little. My father left and child support was something akin to unicorns. I had relatives that helped when possible, but basically money was tight.  So if I wanted something I had to work for it. The difference between then and today is this – I could. By the age of 12 or 13 a kid could find work one way or another. Today that world is as ancient or as mythical as Aesop’s fables.

People of my ilk worked a myriad of jobs growing up. One example not just in my town but nearly everywhere were local grocery stores of one size or another. You would go in and ask the owner if he had anything you could do. This usually came back with a yes. Then you would find yourself doing the most disgusting, gruesome cleaning of some corner or backroom that the owner just never had the time (or guts) to clean themselves. So if you wanted to make money, there you’d go.

But we did it. Why? Because you needed to earn or you went without. There was no alternative. Did they take advantage of us? Well – yes, and no. Some paid better than others. Some you never went back to, and some you could end up working there steady part or full-time. However if you wanted clothes, arcade money, bicycles, or (heaven help you) a car. You did what ever was available. Period.

Those opportunities no longer exist. Today an owner can’t take the chance of hiring a kid for fear of being called before a committee on child labor laws. And God forbid that kid ever received so much as a paper cut. The parents would have a midtown lawyer suing you faster than one can bag groceries. (I believe you have to be 18 today to do that also)

Another way to earn was you could always get a route delivering newspapers. We all had one at one time or another. Some had more than one, and you could earn substantial money for a kid if you were good. All you needed was your feet and back. No barrier with age. If you could do the route, it was yours whether 12, 13, and so on.

Another great difference is this. When we were 16 or 17 most of us wanted nothing more than to be out of school and working so we could run our own lives. Every single person I knew wanted to get a job and move out on their own. Personally I was out of my mother’s home at 17. I was not an outlier. So were most of the people I grew up with.

The effect of starting so early for us was that by the age of 26 we were far away from anything that could ever be called a kid. Today’s generation looks upon their 20’s as a reason to still live at home, stay on mom & dad’s insurance, and continue going to school. The antitheses of everything we were just a short time ago.

Just for context. When I was 16 (and skipping school) I Finagled a job at the local bar to clean. By 17 I was a bartender. (Drinking age was 18 then) At 19 I was the manager, and had an apartment on top of the club. At 23 I made upper management in the meat business, and by 25 conducted my first leveraged buyout and became a CEO. (that’s just a thumbnail sketch)

Today far too many “kids” are living in their parent’s basement or attic. Today those areas are finished with game rooms, bathrooms, separate entrances or more. For us, there wasn’t any of that.

If your parents owned a home in the first place the attic or basement was for storage only. It was used that way because it was either smelly, mildewed, nasty, or all that combined. No place you were going to spend a night let alone live. Yet, a broken down drafty studio apartment of you own with barely any furniture was like paradise because – it was yours!

The take away from all this was our exposure to a work ethic, and we gained early insight into life’s truths that if you wanted something; you had to go out and get it yourself.

However there’s also another side of all this that doesn’t get talked about: The knowing or learning just how hard some jobs were, and how difficult it was for the people who filled them. Many of us that worked in places whether they’d be factories or something else saw just what a real “hard days” work meant.

I remember when I was working in the mills pushing an 1100 pound rolling lunch wagon through the floors of the local textile mills. Right where people were working at their stations making shoes, clothes. leather, and more. You saw up close and personal what the term “work” meant. You also instinctively knew if you didn’t want that for yourself – you had better start getting on the ball with your own life because if you didn’t – life was going to be getting on with you.

That kind of stark reality is not available to today’s youth. I mean truly, what is considered a tough job for today’s “kids?” Flipping burgers? Working at the mall? That would be seen as gravy work compared to some 14-year-old kid cleaning out grease traps in a local grocery store. However you can’t flip a burger till you’re about 18 today because of insurance fears. Which again is the main part of the problem.

The biggest challenge to “kids” today in my opinion is this:

As they continue considering what they want to do with their lives, the adults that are ahead of them with decades of learned experience look and feel healthier than the “kids” that are now half their age.

And coming up behind are the other 26 year old “kids” that skipped the whole school thing and now have nearly a decades worth of real work and life experience while they may have also simultaneously taken night courses.

So whom do you think will be more valuable in today’s turbulent workforce? The ones that went to work 10 years ago now toting a near decades worth of work experience? The healthier adults of this day and age with decades of real experience? Or a “kid” just out of school with some degree at 26 living at home with their parents?

Think about it. Because life doesn’t think – it does.

© 2012 Mark St.Cyr

MYTR Audio: Brexit Proves It’s All A Central Bank Illusion

This is a new feature that will be part of upcoming exclusive content offered by Mark. It’s a work in progress, and a little raw, but we wanted to get it out there. Content such as this will only be available to subscribers to the blog, more details coming very soon. It’s a read through by Mark of his latest article and (as usual) there’s no edits or retakes hence the “raw” reference.

V.V. -StreetCry Media

 

Studio 1

Can’t see the media player? Click (here)

 

© 2016 Mark St.Cyr in association with StreetCry Media Partners. All Rights Reserved

Audio Repost from Mark’s “Prose Series”

Since many readers and followers of Mark’s blog are primarily business people we thought this insight regarding “traffic” as opposed to “sales” from 2012 would be appropriate during this Thanksgiving interlude. With the holiday season now in full swing it’s important to remember why you’re in business in the first place.
V.V. -StreetCry Media

 

Beware Of “The Hit Men”

This podcast and more available in iTunes®

© 2012 Mark St.Cyr in association with StreetCry Media. All Rights Reserved

The quick hitting no holds barred series based on “Mr. Engineer, please hit the record button and let’s go!” Designed and delivered to be thought provoking and unique for its forget about edits and retakes format.

Can’t see the media player on your mobile device? Click here.

Audio Podcast from Mark’s “Prose Series”

Getting Specific

MYTR LogoThis podcast and more available in iTunes®

© 2012 Mark St.Cyr in association with

StreetCry Media. All Rights Reserved

The quick hitting no holds barred series based on
“Mr. Engineer, please hit the record button and let’s go!”
Designed and delivered to be thought provoking and unique
for its forget about edits and retakes format.

Can’t see the media player on your mobile device? Click here.

Mark’s Response For A Recommendation Of Sales Advice

A common question Mark receives whether he’s speaking or, in response to an article is: “What is the best advice you would give to someone just starting out in sales today?” We believe his answer is an interesting one, and since the blog has grown exponentially over these last few years, we thought we’d share this for the many new readers who don’t know this side of Mark. So we transposed and posted it here.

V.V. at StreetCry Media

Question: “What is the best advice you would give to someone just starting out in sales today?”

Mark: “It’s a good question. However, what I’m going to say next will probably put many of you off at first. Yet, what you need to do is not only hear me out, rather, if you doubt what I’m saying that’s fine. Doubt is not a bad thing and you shouldn’t just take what I or anyone else says as gospel. Nevertheless, doubt doesn’t mean discount or discard unless; you have actually researched or tried it and compared results to what you may now be doing. Let me also state: I believe this pertains to not only ‘new’ but also veteran, as well as any business person regardless of the size or scope of your enterprise as well as your title. In other words, whether you’re a new start-up, solo-entrepreneur, or CEO of some mega-global-conglomerate, all can benefit. I know, it’s a bold statement, but that’s what I do.

So with that said it beaks down into two parts. First: I would recommend you either put down, close, shelve, whatever else all of the most recent “sales” books you’ve been recommended over the last few years. Personally, I’ve read most of them, and I am of the opinion that most are nothing more than some form of psychobabble shrouded within the dust jacket of what is called a “sales” guide. Again, in my opinion which is what you asked for; I think most of them are pure junk.

Are there some good ones? Of course, but they are few and far between and most of the good ones were written years ago. Most of today’s are nothing more of a reiteration of those, and because they want to attach their name to them, or be able to affix the ‘new and improved’ moniker as to try to boost a sale. They’ve made the underlying message of how one can actually enhance or make a sale indistinguishable from some form of added junk science or thought experiments.

For the basics, as well as a refresher for a veteran, I personally, too this day still think Tom Hopkins’ – How to Master the Art of Selling Anything is a must. Period. Now here’s why: It covers just about everything one needs to know. It doesn’t matter if you use everything he says, but you sure in heck need to know what’s in there such as closing techniques, phraseology, cold calling principles and more.

Again, whether you use them is not the issue. Knowing if they are ever being used on you can be worth the price paid alone!

Think about that for a minute. Isn’t that also just as important? Now with that all being said let me also add: Today, I am considered a journeyman sales person. In other words it doesn’t matter the product, or if it’s a tangible or intangible. Doesn’t matter if it’s worth fifty cents, or fifty million. Nor do I care if my sales are one-on-one, or to a boardroom. I can hit the ground running and selling faster than most could finish reading their employee manual regardless of product. Why? I know how to sell. I can say this because I have the career or resume’ to prove it, so it shouldn’t be taken as a distinction without a difference.

The ‘product’ per se is a mere detail in the selling process. Far too many are stuck thinking the opposite as in ‘only more product knowledge equals more product sales.’ It doesn’t. Many times, it can hinder if not kept in its proper perspective. If you doubt me answer this question: If product knowledge equaled sales then why isn’t the engineering staff the highest paid? And when a company needs to increase sales immediately one thing you’ll never hear shouted in any serious company is “Get the engineering staff on the road cold calling!”

Once you learn or refresh yourself with that program or book I believe everything else you’ll learn will be out in the field. And what you’ll find more often than not is every sales objection and more will be nothing more than some derivative of the examples discussed or described in that book. Now onto the second part.

Next, I would suggest any and all salespeople, regardless of how long they’ve been at it to watch a televised home shopping channel of their choice. Yes, I did just say that and here’s why.

Regardless of the product both the host as well as the product presenter must not only hit the benefits of their product, but must do it continuously sometimes for hours taking questions, calls, or just to fill airtime. No matter what, they need to find ways as to express why you need their product. Even if they sold a competitors moments or days earlier. It doesn’t matter. They have to come up with reasons why you need this one. Many times, in some ways, not only can you learn, it can be downright comical like “Well we know you just bought X earlier today, but that’s old news, this is the one you need now!” You should be able to do the equivalent with your own products or services. If you couldn’t respond and fill airtime for just one segment of this type of format – than maybe you aren’t as prepared, or as good, as you possibly think or believe you are.

Never mind the benefits of your product and how many you know. You should know at least 10 main objections you may face as to why someone might not buy; and have at least two or three different answers as to why that objection is a positive. If you think I’m kidding or exaggerating like I said ‘this is why you need to watch these programs’ because they do.

Again, you’ll hear negatives spun into a positive so many times, so effortlessly it can be comical when your watching with a changed eye and viewpoint. You’ll hear things like ‘ well we had that deal yesterday that was considered spectacular, but today? This one is stupendous!’ Or, ‘Well the model in blue is now sold out, however, who wants the same blue as everyone else; when you can be the only one to have the mint-avocado model where there’s two hundred million still available!’ Again, the salesmanship and insights are instructive if you watch with a learning eye as well as mindset.”

If you think you can’t find sales insights on the ‘idiot box’ I’ll give you one more that many of you will laugh at however, after I say it you’ll never be able to watch it again, that is if you do at all without harking back to this insight.

Watch any of these programs that are like in the search of aliens, or Nostradamus, or ancient this or that. Listen to the proposed questions about what might be or not and how the framing takes place as to push their hypothesis. An example might sound like this, ‘We dug 3 inches into the soil and found this gum wrapper, however, gum was never seen in this area till recently, how did this foil manage to be covered in any dirt unless? Maybe aliens?’ Of course it’s an absurd example yet, if you listen as to how every question is framed back as to give a reason the show or host is enamored with, you can learn how you too should be able to do similar techniques regarding your own products. And besides, who doesn’t want to learn a technique wrapped up in alien technology? C’mon, why not have some fun with it?

So getting back to this topic with a little more seriousness. Although the examples may at first sound laughable, I’ll reiterate they are anything but – if: you are actively engaged and looking for sales insights as to expand or hone your current sales skills. And I’ll finish with one last point. One might think my recommendation of a Tom Hopkins book or program is old hat, or doesn’t really address today’s sales situations for it was written a few decades ago. Well, it’s a fair point, so I’ll leave you with this.

In 1988 I personally went to a Tom’s sales Boot Camp program. At the time my life had really taken turns for the worse, everything was going wrong. I made a commitment to learn the material, make it mine, and set some goals. Twenty years later, not only had I hit many professional marks, I did them in sales across many different markets from the tangible, to the intangible, small-scale, to large corporate international. Across multiple markets as well ethnic barriers and others to finally retiring 20 years later at the age of 45. While through all of it, as well as what I’ve accomplished as of today, including what I’ve also read thus far: I still believe, as well as recommend it as one of the musts for anyone serious in sales of any type; bar none.

Now one may take that endorsement and question it however you want. Just remember, it’s coming from someone whose accomplished many of the goals many of you are striding for. And still believes it’s one of the best. So make sure you take that into your consideration also.”

© 2015 Mark St.Cyr

Answering a question

Hello all,

I just wanted to put up – that yes, that is, this Mark in the “blurb” section for Seth Godin’s newest book: “What To Do – When It’s Your Turn”

For those that may have no idea I posted a screen shot of it below.

Screen Shot 2014-12-09 at 3.37.14 PM

We know Mr. Godin has his pick of anyone he would like to write a blurb for any of his works. And Mark was more than thrilled that Mr. Godin chose to use his during the release of what might be a real sea change in books. I can tell you straight out that Mark was more than honored.

Best!

V.V. -StreetCry Media