F.T.W.S.I.J.D.G.I.G.T.

(For those who say I just don’t get it…get this)

In October of 2012 I made the following commentary, which at the time, was seen as painting with far too broad of a brush.

Today? I would like to, once again, enter into evidence that I possibly understood far more than those that thought otherwise.

In regards to your “competition” and why “retirement” for fear of competing against the “younger crowd” isn’t going to be what it used to be, i.e., ageism is about to be spun on its proverbial head. I articulated the following. To wit:

We started becoming self-sufficient at about age 13. For those trying to put the age to a year. I was born in the early 1960’s. So that’s my time frame for this discussion.

When I was a kid we had very little. My father left and child support was something akin to unicorns. I had relatives that helped when possible, but basically money was tight.  So if I wanted something I had to work for it. The difference between then and today is this – I could. By the age of 12 or 13 a kid could find work one way or another. Today that world is as ancient or as mythical as Aesop’s fables.

People of my ilk worked a myriad of jobs growing up. One example not just in my town but nearly everywhere were local grocery stores of one size or another. You would go in and ask the owner if he had anything you could do. This usually came back with a yes. Then you would find yourself doing the most disgusting, gruesome cleaning of some corner or backroom that the owner just never had the time (or guts) to clean themselves. So if you wanted to make money, there you’d go.

Another great difference is this. When we were 16 or 17 most of us wanted nothing more than to be out of school and working so we could run our own lives. Every single person I knew wanted to get a job and move out on their own. Personally I was out of my mother’s home at 17. I was not an outlier. So were most of the people I grew up with.

The effect of starting so early for us was that by the age of 26 we were far away from anything that could ever be called a kid. Today’s generation looks upon their 20’s as a reason to still live at home, stay on mom & dad’s insurance, and continue going to school. The antitheses of everything we were just a short time ago.

However there’s also another side of all this that doesn’t get talked about: The knowing or learning just how hard some jobs were, and how difficult it was for the people who filled them. Many of us that worked in places whether they’d be factories or something else saw just what a real “hard days” work meant.

I remember when I was working in the mills pushing an 1100 pound rolling lunch wagon through the floors of the local textile mills. Right where people were working at their stations making shoes, clothes. leather, and more. You saw up close and personal what the term “work” meant. You also instinctively knew if you didn’t want that for yourself – you had better start getting on the ball with your own life because if you didn’t – life was going to be getting on with you.

So whom do you think will be more valuable in today’s turbulent workforce? The ones that went to work 10 years ago now toting a near decades worth of work experience? The healthier adults of this day and age with decades of real experience? Or a “kid” just out of school with some degree at 26 living at home with their parents?

From my Article: The Problem with Kids Today – They’re 26!

So what does this have to do with today? Great question, again, to wit:

Via the Washington Post™ Monday, Aug. 19, 2019

When Joann Alfonzo, a pediatrician in Freehold, N.J., walked into her office recently she mentally rolled her eyes when she saw her next patient: a 26-year-old car salesman in a suit and tie.

“That’s no longer a kid. That’s a man,” she recalls thinking.

Yet, Alfonzo wasn’t that surprised. In the past five years, she has seen the age of her patients rise, as more young adults remain at home and, thanks to the Affordable Care Act, on their parents’ health insurance until age 26.

“First it was 21, then 23 and now 26,” Alfonzo says. “A lot of them can’t afford to live on their own and get their own insurance, or even afford the co-pay. And if insurance is offered at work, there’s generally a cost share involved, if insurance is provided at all.”

The idea of young adults continuing to see their longtime pediatricians has been around for quite some time – it was a laugh line on “Friends” in its last TV season in 2004. Rachel takes her child to a pediatrician, she sees the child’s father, Ross, in the waiting room and realizes he’s still a patient.

But these days that’s pretty realistic, Alfonzo says. “We have people who have had children, and they still see us, so we’re seeing the parents and their children, concurrently,” she says.

Caren Chesler: “He’s 26 years old but still sees a pediatrician: Why some young adults don’t move on.”

And people still want to argue with me that today’s business environment is too competitive and only for the young.

Hogwash!

© 2019 Mark St.Cyr

Footnote: These “FTWSIJDGIGT” articles came into being when many of the topics I had opined on over the years were being openly criticized for “having no clue”. Yet, over the years, these insights came back around showing maybe I knew a little bit more than some were giving me credit for. It was my way of tongue-in-cheek as to not use the old “I told you so” analogy. I’m saying this purely for the benefit of those who may be new or reading here for the first time. I never wanted or want to seem like I’m doing the “Nah, nah, nah, nah, nah” type of response to my detractors. I’d rather let the chips fall – good or bad – and let readers decide the credibility of either side. Occasionally however, there are and have been times they do need to be pointed out, which is why these now have taken on a life of their own. (i.e., something of significance per se that may have a direct impact on one’s business etc., etc.) And readers, colleagues, and others have requested their continuance.