The Impending Resurrection of…”The Middle Man”

I can hear you all now…“He has lost his mind!”…but I don’t think so, and here’s why……

Anyone who is able to remember the wonderful tones of a dial-up modem connecting to the internet can also remember when a company offered true customer service. Not the so-called “customer service” that everyone encounters when they have a real issue, e.g, “Hello…You’re call is important to us, you are number 453,264 in line. Your expected wait time is…14 months, 22 days, and 13 hours, So please stay on the line….” Gives me a headache just typing that line, but I digress. Before that time you more than likely made your purchases through a so-called “Middle Man.” Before Wal-Mart it was  the local retailer, before Amazon it was the local bookstore, you catch the drift I’m sure. Now it’s the internet, with just about everyone buying something whether it’s a dog collar or a 5 bedroom home on a beach. You want it? Just enter your credit card number….done! However, what you can’t do is experience the product and have all the minutia explained in ways you truly understand. What’s even more valuable than that? The true customer service that came with dealing with the local retailer.

In a world that’s now acutely aware that you can instantaneously compare prices from around the world, what you can’t do is experience true customer service unless you’re face to face with the merchant. The beauty of this model is becoming acutely aware to both retailers, and customers once again. It is a fact, you can not give superior customer service at bargain basement prices. It just doesn’t work, and it never has.

The entrepreneurs that are seeing the value that has always been in the true customer service model are finding that there is, and will always be a market for this service. The beauty of the model if you dare to embrace it, is the fact that you might not be the “biggest”….but you might surely be the “best,” and that will lead you to higher profits, better employees, and loyal customers. That’s a strategy worth aiming for rather than trying to be the cheapest. After all…..It’s hard to compete with “Going Out of Business” sales…..So why try?

Mark